Question: What Cafcass Look For?

What are safeguarding checks cafcass?

Safeguarding checks: We carry out checks with the police and the local authority to find out whether there are any known safety or welfare risks to your children..

Do judges go against cafcass?

Cafcass data from 2012 shows that in cases where the family court makes a final ruling, Cafcass recommendations are enforced 76.4% of the time. In a further 14.3% of cases they are enforced subject to court review. Cafcass recommendations are not enforced in only 3.6% of cases.

What police checks do cafcass do?

A Level 2 police check is a request by Cafcass for the disclosure, and provision by Police, of any relevant information held on the databases of a local police force(s) including local intelligence, call out logs and domestic abuse records.

What shows up on a police check?

A police check shows all court findings of guilt, not just convictions. This means that even if no conviction was recorded for an offence, it will appear on your police check regardless. … Generally, traffic offences are not criminal offences and will not appear on a police check.

Do mothers have more rights than fathers UK?

All mothers and most fathers have legal rights and responsibilities as a parent – known as ‘parental responsibility’. If you have parental responsibility, your most important roles are to: provide a home for the child. protect and maintain the child.

What do judges look at when deciding custody?

Judges must decide custody based on “the best interests of the child.” The “best interests of the child” law requires courts to focus on the child’s needs and not the parent’s needs. The law requires courts to give custody to the parent who can meet the child’s needs best .

What should you not say to cafcass?

You should not: Say anything negative about the other parent unless raised by the officer. You should then be as fair and even-handed as possible and not expand on their weaknesses. Ask the CAFCASS officer for their advice on how to deal with the children or the other parent.

What’s a Section 7 report?

A Section 7 Report is a report written by an Independent Social Worker in cases where an application has been made to the Court in accordance with The Children Act 1989 section 8. An Independent Social Worker provides an independent evaluation and assessment of a situation and reports the findings to the Court.

How do I contact cafcass?

phone 0300 456 4000 – the Cafcass call centre is open 09.00 to 17.00 Monday to Thursday and 09.00 to 16.30 Friday (excluding bank holidays)

What questions do cafcass ask on phone?

The telephone interviewThe child’s situation;The relevance of information from the safeguarding checks;Any concerns about things like domestic abuse, alcohol or substance misuse and mental health problems.

Will cafcass speak to my child?

The Cafcass worker will: usually talk to your children alone – this may be at a neutral venue such as at their school. spend time with you and the other party and listen to any concerns you might have.

What age does a court listen to a child?

If the question of who the child is to live with has to be resolved through court proceedings, then the courts will start to place weight on a child’s wishes when they are considered competent to understand the situation. This can be around the age of 12 or 13 but varies on the circumstances.

What happens at your first hearing in Family Court?

It is very unlikely that your case will be dealt with at the first hearing. You are likely to have to go back to the Family Court on two or more occasions. At the first hearing, the court may make directions as to the filing of statements of case, or evidence, and give deadlines for when these things need to be filed.

How can I impress cafcass?

Tips When Meeting CAFCASSDo speak calmly and clearly;Do tell the truth;Do explain to the CAFCASS Officer why you believe shared parenting is in your children´s best interests unless there are genuine and serious welfare concerns;Do give the Officer information about your past involvement in the children´s care;More items…